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Be wise – bring hearing protection to CCMF

Wellness
Close-up Of Yellow Earplug Into The Ear Of Person

The Carolina Country Music Fest, coming June 6-9 to Myrtle Beach, will be music to the ears of country music lovers.
Thousands are expected to gather to sing and dance to hits by Florida Georgia Line, Dierks Bentley, Thomas Rhett and many more top entertainers.
As much fun as a concert can be, loud music can contribute to hearing loss. To help ensure you’re able to enjoy many more festivals, it’s important to take precautions to protect your hearing.
Dr. James Turek, a family medicine physician at Tidelands Health, the official health care system of the festival, says a few simple steps can help protect your hearing during the three-day event.

Understand the risks

A sound’s loudness is measured in decibels. Normal conversation is about 60 decibels, a lawn mower is about 90 decibels and a loud rock concert is about 120 decibels.
Sounds over 85 decibels can be harmful depending on how long and often a person is exposed.
“To protect your hearing at a concert, limiting your exposure is key,” says Dr. Turek.

Wear protection

One way to reduce the risk of hearing damage is to wear earplugs or earmuffs to reduce the volume. Inexpensive ear plugs will typically do the trick, but for a few more dollars you can purchase high-fidelity versions that reduce volume while minimizing loss of musical detail.

Take breaks

Turek also suggest festivalgoers take periodic breaks from the music. Resting your ears from continuous sound can be beneficial, says Turek, who recommends taking a break from the music every hour.
“Go get a snack or head to the bathroom and give your ears a rest for a few minutes,” he says.

Stay away from speakers

If possible, stake out a space that’s not too the close to the speakers. It can be fun to be at the front of the crowd, but being close to the speakers is more likely to subject you to higher sound volumes.
For those attending the festival, there’s some good news. An outdoor music festival is generally safer for your hearing than an indoor event where the sound is contained.
“When it comes to hearing loss, the key is to think long term,” says Dr. Turek. “If you love music now, you’ll want to be able to enjoy it your entire life.”

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